06 June 2019 UK Books

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UK Books + Archive

June 2019 : New Titles

A personal selection from a plethora of titles …

Fiction

Red Dog: A Novel of the African Frontier

Red Dog

by Willem Anker

Published in Afrikaans in 2014, this is the first of Anker’s novels to be translated into English. It tells of Coenraad de Buys, a rebel who fights with Xhosa chieftains against the Boers and the British in the 18th-century Cape Colony.

Pushkin Press, £16.99, 6th June 2019, 9781782274223

My Name Is Monster

My Name Is Monster

by Katie Hale

A lead debut for Canongate, this is billed as a retelling of Robinson Crusoe on its 300th anniversary. In a dystopian Britain ruined by the Sickness and the bombs, there are two survivors; Monster, who washes up on the coast of Scotland after surviving in an Arctic vault, and the feral girl she finds on her long walk south.

Canongate Books Ltd, £14.99, 6th June 2019, 9781786896353

The Wild Wind

The Wild Wind

by Sheena Kalayil

A woman remembers her 1970s childhood in Lusaka, Zambia, before peaceful family life was disrupted by politics and war. From the author of The Bureau of Second Chances.

Polygon An Imprint of Birlinn Limited, £8.99, 6th June 2019, 9781846974915

The Ten Loves of Mr Nishino

by Hiromi Kawakami 

I loved The Nakano Thrift Shop and am looking forward to this one, about an elusive ladies’ man and the women who have loved him.

Granta Books, £12.99, 6th June 2019, 9781846276972

The Most Fun We Ever Had

The Most Fun We Ever Had

by Claire Lombardo

Multi-generational novel charting the lives of the Sorenson family in Illinois; Marilyn and David fall in love in the 1970s, and by 2016 have four radically different daughters. W&N is comparing it to Anne Tyler.

Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £16.99, 27th June 2019, 9781474611862

Henry, Himself

Henry, Himself

by Stewart O’Nan

As the 20th century draws to a close, 75-year-old Henry Maxwell looks back on the loves and losses of his past and wonders if he has done right by the people he loves.

Allen & Unwin, £14.99, 6th June 2019, 9781911630333

Mac and His Problem

Mac and His Problem

by Enrique Vila-Matas

An unemployed 60-year-old man with literary ambitions decides that, while he will not write his own stories, he will read, revise and improve those published by his neighbour, a celebrated novelist. “A writer who has no equal in the contemporary landscape of the Spanish novel,” reckoned Roberto Bolao.

Harvill Secker, £14.99, 6th June 2019, 9781787300453

 

Non-fiction

Reading Between the Lines: What your handwriting says about you

Reading Between the Lines: What your handwriting says about you

by Emma Bache

Are you creative with a strong imagination? Or easily distracted and oversensitive? Or perhaps you have a strong physical and sexual drive? Using real-life examples, including those of the famous (the Obamas and Donald Trump included), the UK’s leading handwriting expert shows you how what we put down on paper exposes how we react with the world and the people around us.

Quercus Publishing, £9.99, 11th June 2019, 9781787470569

Ada Lovelace: The World's First Computer Programmer (Trailblazing Women)

Ada Lovelace: The World’s First Computer Programmer

by Annabelle Cox

“Thrilling” new biography of Ada Lovelace, the pioneer of computer programming. It aims to acquaint readers with all aspects of her inspiring life and career, including her social and educational exploits with the leading scientists and writers of the Victorian era.

Pen & Sword History, £14.99, 1st August 2019, 9781526730497

Say What Happened: A Story of Documentaries

Say What Happened: A Story of Documentaries

by Nick Fraser

The creator of BBC “Storyville”, which has produced many award-winning films since it was founded 18 years ago, traces the history of documentary making, from its early pioneers to the present day. In a world beset with “fake news”, Fraser argues that documentaries are better at “getting the verities of life and death”.

Faber & Faber, £20.00, 1st August 2019, 9780571329564

What We Really Do All Day: Insights from the Centre for Time Use Research (Pelican Books)

What We Really Do All Day: Insights from the Centre for Time Use Research

by Jonathan Gershuny

Covering 55 years of change, an introduction to the field of Time Use Research; that is, the collection and analysis of detailed data on our daily lives as a means of understanding our society and economy-from whether we are sleeping less and spending more time at work, to whether the internet has affected the way we use our spare time.

Pelican, £9.99, 1st July 2017, 9780241285565

Holidays and High Society: The Golden Age of Travel

Holidays and High Society: The Golden Age of Travel

by Lucinda Gosling

This “stunning visual feast” of a gift book traces the growth of some of Europe’s most exclusive holiday destinations—Monte Carlo, St Moritz, Biarritz—revealing a world of gossip and glamour. In association with the Mary Evans Picture Library.

The History Press Ltd, £14.99, 3rd June 2019, 9780750990080

Everyday Harumi: Simple Japanese food for family and friends

Everyday Harumi: Simple Japanese food for family and friends

by Harumi Kurihara

Japan’s most popular cookery writer (“Japan’s answer to Delia Smith”) presents more than 60 recipes which demonstrate how easy it is to cook Japanese food for everyday occasions without needing to shop at specialist food stores. Photographed by award-winning photographer Jason Lowe.

Conran Octopus Ltd, £0.00, 6th June 2019, 9781840917871

Elementary: The Periodic Table Explained

Elementary: The Periodic Table Explained

by James M. Russell

The Periodic Table and its 118 elements are laid bare in this lively, accessible and compelling account of each element, and how they all came together. This year is the International Year of the Periodic Table. I learned that the air we breathe contains more argon than carbon dioxide.

Michael O’Mara Books Ltd, £9.99, 13th June 2019, 9781789291025

Wordy

Wordy

by Simon Schama, CBE

“Wordy is about the intoxication of writing; my sense of playful versatility.” Collection of 50 essays, written across four decades and chosen by the man himself. They cover a vast range of subjects, from the music of Tom Waits and the works of Sir Quentin Blake, to the history of the colour blue, and the skills an actor needs to play Falstaff.

Simon & Schuster Ltd, £20.00, 1st May 2019, 9781471180095

1939: A People's History

1939: A People’s History

by Frederick Taylor

Renowned historian Taylor’s vivid people’s history of the 12 months leading up to the outbreak of war in 1939. It draws on original British and German sources, including interviews, diaries, memoirs and newspapers. It is also “an opportunity for us to learn from our history and a reminder that we must never take peace for granted”.

Picador, £25.00, 25th June 2019, 9781509858743

Paperbacks : Fiction 

The New Me

The New Me

by Halle Butler

The Granta Best Young American Novelist follows the life of 30-year-old Millie, an eternal temp who is offered the change of a permanent job, in this dark comedy about office life and female rage.

Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £8.99, 12th March 2019, 9781474612296

Four Soldiers

Four Soldiers

by Hubert Mingarelli

The award-winning French writer’s story of four soldiers in a forest in 1919, during the Russian civil war. Longlisted for the Man Booker International, Hilary Mantel called it a “small miracle”.

Granta Books, £8.99, 6th June 2019, 9781846276514

Non-fiction

A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

by Andrew Chaikin

A foreword by Tom Hanks for this account of the Apollo programme to mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

Penguin Books Ltd, £12.99, 13th June 2019, 9780241363157

Robin

Robin

by Dave Itzkoff

The New York Times culture reporter’s biography of the late Robin Williams was called “tenderly written” and “frequently hilarious” by the Sunday Times.

Pan Books, £9.99, 11th June 2019, 9781447293231

A Certain Idea of France: The Life of Charles de Gaulle

A Certain Idea of France: The Life of Charles de Gaulle

by Julian Jackson

This biography of Charles de Gaulle has sold over 7,000 hardbacks to date, says Penguin, and was called “masterly” by the Sunday Times.

Penguin Books Ltd, £16.99, 6th June 2019, 9780141049533

The Spy Who Changed History

The Spy Who Changed History: The Untold Story of How the Soviet Union Won the Race for America’s Top Secrets

by Svetlana Lokhova

An account of Soviet espionage in the 1930s, led by Stanislav Shumovsky’s arrival in New York in 1931. “Remarkable,” said the Telegraph.

William Collins, £9.99, 13th June 2019, 9780008238148

1939: Countdown to War

1939: Countdown to War

by Richard Overy

An hour-by-hour re-creation of the last days of peace in 1939, called “indispensible” by the Times.

Penguin Books Ltd, £9.99, 29th April 2010, 9780141041308

Churchill & Smuts: From Enemies to Lifelong Friends

Churchill & Smuts: From Enemies to Lifelong Friends

by Richard Steyn

The story of Winston Churchill and Jan Smuts, who started out as enemies but were friends for half a century. Over 6,000 copies sold in South Africa, says Robinson.

Robinson, £10.99, 13th June 2019, 9781472140777

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World

by Adam Tooze

The Observer said this account of the financial crash of 2008 was a “landmark” book.

Penguin Books Ltd, £12.99, 6th June 2019, 9780141032214

She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Story of Heredity, Its Past, Present and Future

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Story of Heredity, Its Past Present and Future

by Carl Zimmer

The science writer gives a history of our understanding of heredity. Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction.

Picador, £12.99, 11th June 2019, 9781509818556