Archive (Nelson Mandela)

Mandela capture site sculpture

Nelson Mandela

18 July 1918 – 5 December 2013

19 June The Telegraph Nelson Mandela’s former PA hits out at ‘disgraceful’ government handling of his death

 

19 June The Guardian ‘Nelson Mandela’s rock’ accuses his family of freezing out Graça Machel

19 June Eyewitness News : ‘Good Morning, Mr Mandela

19 June News 24 Military doctors treated Mandela badly – Zelda

19 June SABC News ‘Good Morning Mr Mandela’ the story of a metamorphosis

 

 

 

La Grange

Zelda La Grange | Good Morning, Mr Mandela | Penguin 9780241004012 | hbk | R430

Good Morning, Mr Mandela, the extraordinary story of how a young woman had her life and everything she once believed in transformed by the greatest man of her time.
Zelda la Grange grew up in South Africa as a white Afrikaner who supported the rules of segregation. Yet a few years after the end of Apartheid she would become the trusted assistant to Nelson Mandela. Now she shares his lasting and inspiring gifts with the world.
Helen Conford, Publishing Director, said, “This is a book that will touch your life and make you believe that every one of us, no matter who we are or what we have done, has the power to change. It has brought tears to the eyes of everyone who has read it. It shines with honesty and love. The lessons Nelson Mandela gave her as he renewed his country offer hope to everyone.”

 

Penguin to Publish Memoir by Nelson Mandela’s Most Trusted Assistant, Zelda la Grange

Zelda la Grange and Nelson Mandela

Penguin is delighted to announce that they will be publishing Zelda la Grange’s Good Morning Mr Mandela, the extraordinary story of how a young woman had her life and everything she once believed in transformed by the greatest man of her time.

Good Morning Mr Mandela’s publication date is 19 June, 2014.

Press release:

On June 19 2014, Penguin will publish worldwide Good Morning, Mr Mandela, the extraordinary story of how a young woman had her life and everything she once believed in transformed by the greatest man of her time.

Zelda la Grange grew up in South Africa as a white Afrikaner who supported the rules of segregation. Yet a few years after the end of apartheid she would become the trusted assistant to Nelson Mandela. Now she shares his lasting and inspiring gifts with the world.

Helen Conford, publishing director, says, “This is a book that will touch your life and make you believe that every one of us, no matter who we are or what we have done, has the power to change. It has brought tears to the eyes of everyone who has read it. It shines with honesty and love. The lessons Nelson Mandela gave her as he renewed his country offer hope to everyone.”

Helen Conford acquired world English rights from Jonny Geller at Curtis Brown. Good Morning, Mr Mandela will be published by Allen Lane. Frederik de Jager at Penguin South Africa will publish in Afrikaans as well as English. Clare Ferraro and Wendy Wolf will publish at Viking US.

A percentage of royalties from the book will be donated by the author to the Nelson Mandela Foundation.

Image courtesy of The Mirror

Acknowledgments : http://penguin.bookslive.co.za/blog/

http://www.booksetc.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/9781928213130-Mandela-In-Celebration-of-a-Great-Life-Charlene-Smith-LR.jpg

Charlene Smith | Mandela : In Celebration of a Great Life | Struik 9781928213130 | hbk, 128pp | R350 | new edition, June 2014

The measure of politicians is not their words but what they do to improve the lives of their people. A successful lawyer, Nelson Mandela sacrificed career, family and freedom to pursue an extravagant ideal: a non-racist, non-sexist future for a nation apparently determined to remain divided. READ MORE

Gibbs

Timothy Gibbs | Mandela’s Kinsmen | Jacana 9781431410651 | tpb, 224pp | R225 | May 2014

First published in the UK by James Currey Publishers

The old Transkei has long been considered a forlorn, barely relevant entity at the margins of South African history, a world of corrupted Bantustan bureaucrats and poor peasants. Tim Gibbs gently upends this myth, persuading us that we cannot understand contemporary South Africa until we come to terms with the importance of its “hinterland”. This book is bound to make you think about South Africa and the forces that have shaped it in ways you haven’t considered before. – Jonny Steinberg
Mandela’s Kinsmen is the first study of the fraught relationships between the ANC and their relatives inside apartheid’s
first ‘tribal’ Bantustan. Timothy Gibbs reinterprets the complex connections between nationalist elites and the chieftaincies, and overlapping ideologies of national and ethnic belonging.
In South Africa, like the rest of the continent, the chieftaincies had often been well-springs of African leadership in the early 20th century, producing leaders such as Nelson Mandela, who hailed from the ‘Native Reserves’ of rural Transkei. But then the apartheid government turned South Africa’s chieftaincies into self-governing, tribal Bantustans in order to shatter African nationalism, starting with Transkei in 1963.

Drawing on a wealth of first-hand accounts and untapped archives, Mandela’s Kinsmen offers a vividly human account of
how the Bantustan era ruptured rural society. Nevertheless, Gibbs uncovers the social and political institutions and networks that connected the nationalist leadership on Robben Island and in exile to their kinsmen inside the Transkei.
Even at the climax of the apartheid era – when interlocking nationalist insurgencies spiralled into ethnically based civil wars across South Africa and the southern African region – elite connections still straddled Bantustan divides. These relationships would shape the apartheid endgame and forge the post apartheid policy.

Christo Brand and Barbara Jones | Doing Life With Mandela : My Prisoner, My Friend | Jonathan Ball 9781868426089 | tpb, 288pp | R210 | April 2014
 “I was 19 years old when I came face to face with Nelson Mandela. He was 60. Until that day I had never heard of him, or his African National Congress. I was his prison warder on Robben Island and he changed my life forever.” The two of them – one a young white warder, the other serving a life sentence – should have become bitter enemies. Instead they formed an extraordinary friendship through small acts of human kindness. Christo, a gentle young man who valued ordinary decency and courtesy, struck a chord with the wise and resilient freedom fighter. This bond of trust endured between the two men long after Mandela was freed. In this book Christo tells, for the first time, the incredible and moving story of their unlikely friendship. He provides rare and personal insights into Mandela’s life during his years on Robben Island.

 

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